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Who Says Training Has To Be All Work And No Play??

Dog training with Sit Means Sit San Antonio & Austin can be a lot of work for the dogs but it’s not just all work. They get to have fun too! With our off leash training we are able to reliably have our dogs off leash to play and run knowing that we can call them to us at any given time! Want your dog to do the same? Call us for a free demonstration and evaluation!

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What Is Puppy Mange and How Is it Treated?

What Is Mange and How is it Treated in DogsYou are playing with your puppy and suddenly notice some bald spots on its sides and around the eyes. You look closely, and there are some scabs and the beginnings of sores. Now you are putting two and two together. The pet has been scratching a lot and even chewing on its fur. As you are inspecting the animal’s body, you notice red blotches, crusty deposits and additional areas of hair loss. The signs are clear: Your pet is a victim of puppy mange, which is known in veterinarian circles as demodectic mange or red mange.

How do Dogs get Mange?

At the root of the problem is a mite called Demodex canis. This mite – as well as others – naturally lives on your dog’s skin. Taking up residence inside the hair follicles, the animal’s immune system is usually sufficient to counteract any attacks from these mites. But when an adult canine gets stressed or is sick, the faltering immune system allows the mite population to wreak havoc with the animal’s skin. Puppy mange occurs in some young dogs because their immune systems are still developing and therefore may not be ready yet to handle the mite’s effects. With puppies, the mites are transferred from the mother via direct contact during the first week of life.

Why does Puppy Mange look different in Canines?

How to treat dog mange in Austin and San AntonioWhen mites suddenly reproduce heavily in one area of the dog’s fur, the hair loss will be localized. If the mite population explodes all across the animal’s body, then the entire skin surface may be affected with visible hair loss and scab formation.

What Is the right Treatment for the Condition?

As a dog lover, you are of course upset over your puppy’s mange and its resulting effects on the dog’s look. But veterinarians agree that the spotty appearance, which points to localized mange, will usually work itself out as the animal’s immune system grows stronger. Even so, it is a good idea to take the pet to the veterinarian for an actual diagnosis.

In the cases of young dogs with localized puppy mange, the veterinarian may recommend a shampoo that soothes the skin and suggest a wait-and-see approach. If the mange covers the entire body, it is possible to treat the pet with oral medications, injections or topically applied foams. A repeated visit may be indicated to see how well the skin conditions are responding to the treatment.

Can I Prevent a Recurrence?

What does mange look like on a dogYes, you can. For starters, booster you companion canine’s immune system. The experts at Sit Means Sit gladly provide you with information about nutritionally balanced dog food that meets the animal’s nutritional requirements on a daily basis. Next, keep your annual vet appointments. Catching the onset of diseases or conditions requiring treatment prevents the immune system from getting compromised. As long as it is supported, it will keep the mites at bay. If your dog has been put on medications for certain conditions, there is a possibility that these drugs are interfering with the immune system. Discuss supplementation and other preventative measures with your veterinarian.

Dog Training in Austin and San Antonio

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Elsa the Happy, Energetic Yellow Lab Learns To Focus her Energy on Training!

Karis with Sit Means Sit San Antonio had a squirrly one on her hands with Elsa, the young yellow lab. Elsa is a very happy girl with a ton of energy but we needed to teach her to listen but keep the energy! Karis used places to teach her to control her energy and not only taught her to walk well on a leash, but taught her to walk very well off leash!

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Holiday Dos and Don’ts for Dogs

Holidays can be a time of food and fun for most people, but for dogs they can be a dangerous time of the year. Troy Pfeifer with Sit Means Sit visited our studio on Thursday along with his trusty sidekick Jezebel to share some tips for protecting your pets this time of year. Ornaments, tinsel and other decorations often look like shiny toys to our pets, so we should be mindful of where those items are located in our homes. There are a variety of foods that can also pose health hazards. Very bitter chocolate can be poisonous to dogs, and cooked bones can often splinter and do harm to their internal organs. Bread dough can also be dangerous because the yeast will proof in the dog’s stomach and can cause a blockage. Also food like stuffing that may have a variety of things like onions, garlic and raisins in it should never be given to dogs. A great command to teach your dogs for this time of year is “Leave It”. It helps to prevent an accidental food drop from becoming a dangerous situation.

Check out our 5 Dangerous Holiday Items That Are Harmful to Dogs and our other articles on things your dogs should not have.

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Fun Lovin Pit Bull Mix Makes Huge Progress In His Training!

Cortnie with Sit Means Sit Austin had a strong one on her hands with Bodie, the pit bull mix. He has tons of energy, wants to go everywhere fast and has no desire to listen. But after an immersion board and train with Cortnie he learned how to be the best mannered little man!

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Crazy Black Lab Mix Goes From Crazy Squirmy Dog To a Very Well Behaved Young Lady!

Krystal with Sit Means Sit San Antonio spent 2 weeks with Karly in our board and train immersion program. Krystal taught Karly how to behave around other dogs, how to control her energy, walk well on a leash, but still stay goofy and happy at the same time!

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A Day In The Life of A Board and Train With Sit Means Sit Dog Training!

Ever wonder how a dog spends his day during a board and train? Danielle with Sit Means Sit Austin had a yellow lab, Gracie, for our immersion board and train program and she documented what happens in the day in the life of a board and train! There is a lot of training going on, sit, place, leash walking, off leash stuff but also a lot of fun happens as well!

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Danielle Kilgore Trainer Profile

Danielle KilgoreGrowing up in a little west Texas town, out in the country, we had all types of animals, from horses and goats to gerbils and birds. I learned early on the companionship our pets can give and have remained an animal lover in to adulthood, currently owning two dogs, a cat, a gecko and some fish. But, we always had at least two dogs, and for some reason, I always seemed to have the special relationship with them.

Throughout my childhood, my mom bred and raised Golden Retrievers. I remember each time, when the puppies came, helping her care not only for our mommy dogs, but also the litters of 8-12 pups at a time! I remember staying up late nights, preparing meals, nursing puppies, cleaning up after them, helping potty train them, meeting with the vet to vaccinate them, and so forth. Even in my young age, I knew owning a dog was a major responsibility. I can only remember 9 months of my life when I did not have a dog, and I swear that was only because I wasn’t allowed to while living in student housing during college! Even still, I would “borrow” my cousin’s Shih-tzu to take to the park and on walks weekly. I couldn’t bear to not have a canine companion.
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Preventing Bites with Sit Means Sit at Studio 512

Troy Pfeifer with Sit Means Sit gave us helpful tips on how to avoid getting bitten by a dog, and how you can protect yourself when a dog attacks. When approaching a dog, you should hold out a fist rather than an open hand. If the dog does bite, this will cause much less pain and probably a less severe bite. Approach new dogs like you would a stranger. Hugs and kisses and too much movement can startle a dog right off the bat, so give them a gentle pet on their side to begin with and let it get a feel for you. If you’re nervous about being attacked, become a tree. Be as still as possible and the dog will calm down. If you’re about to be attacked, hold something like a backpack, purse, jacket, etc. between your body and the dog. The dog will focus on the object rather than you. Troy also spoke a little about how to tell differences between a happy dog and one that’s stressed out. Happy dogs will have ears up and a loose wagging tail while stressed or upset dogs may growl, have a closed mouth, ears back, or even lick their snout. If you stop by Sit Means Sit, they offer classes that can teach you more in depth the things he taught us today.Visit Sit Means Sit online or call (512) 348-RUFF [7833] for a free consultation. with Sit Means Sit gave us helpful tips on how to avoid getting bitten by a dog, and how you can protect yourself when a dog attacks. When approaching a dog, you should hold out a fist rather than an open hand. If the dog does bite, this will cause much less pain and probably a less severe bite. Approach new dogs like you would a stranger. Hugs and kisses and too much movement can startle a dog right off the bat, so give them a gentle pet on their side to begin with and let it get a feel for you. If you’re nervous about being attacked, become a tree. Be as still as possible and the dog will calm down. If you’re about to be attacked, hold something like a backpack, purse, jacket, etc. between your body and the dog. The dog will focus on the object rather than you. Troy also spoke a little about how to tell differences between a happy dog and one that’s stressed out. Happy dogs will have ears up and a loose wagging tail while stressed or upset dogs may growl, have a closed mouth, ears back, or even lick their snout. If you stop by Sit Means Sit, they offer classes that can teach you more in depth the things he taught us today.Visit Sit Means Sit online or call (512) 348-RUFF [7833] for a free consultation.

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